Streaming music on the appleTV

I just stumbled across a little feature on the appleTV that I hadn’t been aware of before. It appears that if you create a playlist in the iTunes library that the appleTV is connected to. Then put streaming urls into that playlist. When you then go the internet tab on the appleTV, there will be a playlist menu item with those items in it. This way you should be able to get whichever streaming media that you want on your appleTV.

The Future has arrived

Ever since I moved out to California, one of the things that I’ve secretly wanted was to be able to listen to my favorite music while driving. The problem has always been that my favorite channel by far is the Vocal Trance channel off of Digitally Imported Radio. So this meant that I would need to be able to stream internet radio while driving in the car.

Well, today that day has finally arrived. I noticed yesterday that DI has an iPhone app that allows you to stream their premium channels over 3G. I was listening today for about an hour while out running some errands with Caitlin. I only lost the signal once for about 5 sec while driving in some hills, the app does a great job of buffering and keeping the music going. The quality is great and with ~1hr of streaming it only used 25Mb of data according to the built in meter (I’ll have to double check with ATT’s meter).

One of the greatest things about the app is that if it does cut out for any reason it can determine that it’s at the end of a stream and gracefully fades out so that there aren’t any jarring cuts in or out. Every streaming app should copy this.

Adding RSS discovery to Chrome

For Chrome on the mac, it appears that RSS auto discovery is not included by default. This is the feature that puts a little RSS icon in the URL bar when the page that you’re on has an RSS feed available. In order to enable this feature for Chrome on the mac you need to install this extension. This is an extension from Google and seems to work great.

Then if you find a RSS feed that you’d like to add to ReadPath, drag the link below to your bookmark bar.

Add To ReadPath

Then when you’re on a page that you want to subscribe to, press the bookmarklet and it will have ReadPath subscribe you to the feed.

Changing my comment policy

I’ve turned off comments on this blog for now. While I’ve gotten some great comments in the past, the volume of spam just isn’t worth the hassle. Instead I’ve put a mailto: link at the bottom of each article. This is the best way to get ahold of me anyway. If you send something relevant and worth sharing I’ll add it to the blog post.

Oh, I changed the name of the blog as well. Not as worried about having my real name on the web anymore.

Playing with ESXi

I had to test out a desktop virtualization product (Pano Logic) this week and as part of the installation I needed a VMware ESX base system. I’m a huge user of their Workstation product, but I had never used the ESX line since it used to be so expensive and required certified hardware. Things have changed though and it’s now possible to download a copy of ESXi for free and to run without a dedicated SAN.

One of the difficulties with VMware is that their acronyms can be very difficult to wade through. ESXi is what they refer to as a hypervisor. This essentially is a very cut down operating system that is designed to only run other Virtual Machines. There are some requirements to running ESXi, I had to go through 3-4 servers before I found one that the installer had all of the drivers. I finally got it to run a server I had picked up from Penguin Computing (2x dual core Opteron with 4Gb mem and 250Gb hard drive).

Once I found a server that worked, the system installed quickly. The next problem was that you need to download the vSphere client to administer the server which is windows only (there are command line clients for other operating systems, but I wasn’t ready for that yet). I didn’t have a windows box laying around (all linux and mac), so I had to launch a WinXP VM in workstation on my linux desktop to administer my ESXi server. Amazingly everything worked great.

The next issue that I ran into was that I already had a large number of VMs created that I was using on workstation, but I couldn’t see how to get them on to the ESXi server. In the vSphere client there are clear instructions on how to create a new VM or download an appliance, but not how to import an existing VM. It turns out that VMware has a very simple way of doing this using the VMware Converter. This product works as a switchboard allowing you to convert or move VMs from one place to another, a really handy tool.

Overall ESXi is a great tool for running a whole bunch of server VMs. VMware offers a huge number of management products in the vSphere product line for managing load and moving VMs in a datacenter. But if you just need to run a few VMs on a single server I would definitely recommend looking at ESXi.